Video 1 Oct 601 notes

bigredrobot:

Kurt Busiek dropping the mic on the “wretched, insulting narrative that Kirby’s heirs up and sued Marvel because they smelled money.”

Definitely worth reading the whole thing cuz these screenshots are terrible.

EDITED because I guess my link to his comments was screwy. Should be fixed now.
via .
Video 30 Sep 125 notes

heysawbones:

Punish them.

WELP THAT’S THE END OF CHAPTER ONE, FOLKS. If you haven’t been reading MO because of the page-a-week update schedule, now’s a good time to visit the archive! It is, perhaps, also a good time to share the comic with your friends? Eyebrow waggle.

Beginning of Chapter One

Page 25 - Page 26

Weekly updates resume Monday, 20 October! Stick around for progress updates and THANK YOU for reading!

(oh my god thank you so much)

Photo 26 Sep 1,702 notes daijouboob:

valvala:

shirtp:

metaphor [get] [more anime] [more stickers]

my other car is my girlfriend!!
my other car is me. im gay and can turn into a car

Give me the sticker.

daijouboob:

valvala:

shirtp:

metaphor [get] [more anime] [more stickers]

my other car is my girlfriend!!

my other car is me. im gay and can turn into a car

Give me the sticker.

Text 25 Sep 8,934 notes

untamableshipper said: Hi! Do you have any tips on drawing body figures? Especially the length of the legs? And do you have tips on drawing hands? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Only way to learn figures is to look at them and draw them.  I’ve taken figure drawing and anatomy for artist classes in addition to drawing a lot.  Take them if you can!  And I fuck up legs more than anything because I don’t draw them enough.  Easy springboard though is searching for Andrew Loomis books.

Same with hands, though there are some fairly easy to describe formulas for hands so I drew up a couple rq

First of all, for probably 90% of the hand poses you’re gonna draw, think fingers like the petals on a pinwheel.  They all curve the same degree, in relation to the previous.  

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Video 24 Sep 5,837 notes

rubycurls:

here’s that color tutorial some of you have been asking for! this is super wordy, but I promise everything I wrote is important (and I could write more, color theory is so complicated man) sorry for the terrible design, believe me the graphic design side of me is cringing too

The final drawing!

via Refreshing.
Link 24 Sep 2,326 notes http://pollums.tumblr.com/post/98310570840/bigbigtruck-if-you-plan-to-sell-your-book-on»

bigbigtruck:

If you plan to sell your book on Amazon.com, don’t make the ISBN or Library of Congress number publicly available beforehand. This enables other parties to file with Amazon before you do, in effect “claiming” your spot and preventing you from selling your own book until you can…

via .
Video 24 Sep 5,695 notes

roachpatrol:

cornflakepizza:

{ this is a skill i’ve been using a lot lately, thought i’d share :) }

     {  Distress Tolerance Skill: Coloring Mandalas

PRE-PREP

     1}   go to www.printmandala.com and print a couple of mandalas that you like. (you can also find some on google images.)
     2}   buy set of colored pencils or markers if you don’t have them. more colors = better
     3}   buy a clipboard if you wanna lie in bed and color.
     4}   set these aside and ready to go so they are easily accessible when you are distressed

HOW TO USE DURING DISTRESS

     1}   choose a mandala from your pre-printed stash
     2}   set a timer (phone is good) for 30 minutes
     3}   color it with ur markers or pencils. i prefer pencils.
     4}   optional: play an audiobook or music while coloring. make sure it’s not sad music.
     5}   when timer goes off, stop coloring. ask yourself, what level is my distress right now? if still high, set timer for another 30 minutes and keep coloring. if tolerable, stop coloring and do thing you want to do.
     6}   repeat as needed until distress is tolerable

WHY IT WORKS

     coloring patterns is distracting enough to pull your attention away from negative thoughts/emotions, but mandalas are also repetitive so you can kind of “zone out” while coloring. it feels good being able to create something and you feel a sense of competency or confidence. there’s no competitive aspect to it so you can just do the activity without having to worry about doing it perfect or right or better than anyone else. it can remind you of a simpler time when all that was expected of you was coloring. :) it is easy and almost everyone can do it.

TIPS

    — stick to the timer. even though you want to keep coloring when it goes off, stop once you finish the segment you’re on and put the pencil down. tell yourself you can come back and finish it after you do the thing you’re putting off.

    — you can do this activity without using a timer, especially if you don’t have anything planned for the rest of the day and aren’t using this to distract from a task :)) 

    — practice coloring during times when you’re not distressed, so that when you need to use this skill it will be easier and more “automatic”. i can’t stress this enough. even though coloring is really simple, it’s much better for the activity to feel familiar so that you can easily use it during distress. so if you can practice it during normal times it’ll help u. think of it as homework if you have to — you are building up a memory muscle.

    — if you feel guilty because you’re “wasting time” doing a “childish activity”, remind urself that ur doing this for your mental health, that this is an established skill recommended by top psychotherapists, and that calming down your distress so you can actually *do* the stuff you’re worried about (rather than procrastinating all day about the thing and not actually doing it) is the opposite of wasting time. remember that practicing this skill even when you’re not distressed is HOMEWORK, not optional time wasting thing. also, taking care of ur mental health is not a frivolous activity. it’s very important and crucial to a happy successful life.

I’d like to add that coloring inside the lines neatly and skillfully is something that impresses the fuck out of most artists. Yes, even professional working artists. I have seen artists genuinely lose their shit with admiration when someone could color inside all the lines (sometimes that artist is me). SO if you’re coloring and thinking ‘this is dumb i’m not an artist i bet an artist would laugh at me’ be assured most artists would actually be hooting enviously at you and then asking to borrow your crayons.

Photo 19 Sep 266 notes chriswithata:

chuuface:

I built it! Most artists make them themselves using PVC piping, which you can buy at Lowe’s or some other home improvement store. They’ll cut it for you to any size, so you can build them in a lot of different ways. You can also get the ends threaded so that the connecting pieces screw on, rather than just squeezing on (mine aren’t threaded and it sucks haha). You’ll also need clamps or vices to hold them to the table; most of the people I know use these: 
If you ever go to an AA with them you can see that lots of artists have developed different structure designs. I wouldn’t recommend mine, because the legs just make sure it doesn’t tip toward the customer when it falls over haha; it has to have at least one leg clamped on the side. Here are some of the structures I’ve tried or seen:
My current; anything with legs, btw, takes up space on your table, which is bad if you have lots of stuff (but good if you don’t have that much stuff so it doesn’t look as empty haha):

I used this at Snafucon:

I think this is the standard that most people do:

Shared my friends version of this at AX; it went over once or twice because the under table was bad for our clamps; we figured out it was more stable if we flipped the rubber yellow parts of the clamp mouth backward so they couldn’t slide out:

I just learned this one this year and a friend says it’s very stable; I don’t know if they use two more clamps on the front but I would imagine not:

Some important points:
-Make sure you know the length  of the table. If your top length pipe is too long, you’re screwed.
-Make sure you factor in the added height of the clamp base if there is a height limit for displays at your con (AX has this). A clamp adds an extra 2-3 inches to your display height and if you only measure your piping your display will be too tall.
-Whatever you do, make sure it’s stable. Don’t put it up wobbly and just think, “oh I’ll just be careful.” Wind will come from somewhere, you’ll be helping someone and get distracted, or customers will bump it and poke it and pull on it no matter what you do, so you want to make sure it can’t fall over. Keep the clamps on the back or sides of the table, not where customers (or their children) can bump them or mess with them. Keep in mind that your customers at cons are incredibly excited and usually distracted, that’s the nature of cons, so you’re really responsible for your own stuff here.

Yay!! Ive been looking for something like this. <3

chriswithata:

chuuface:

I built it! Most artists make them themselves using PVC piping, which you can buy at Lowe’s or some other home improvement store. They’ll cut it for you to any size, so you can build them in a lot of different ways. You can also get the ends threaded so that the connecting pieces screw on, rather than just squeezing on (mine aren’t threaded and it sucks haha). You’ll also need clamps or vices to hold them to the table; most of the people I know use these: image

If you ever go to an AA with them you can see that lots of artists have developed different structure designs. I wouldn’t recommend mine, because the legs just make sure it doesn’t tip toward the customer when it falls over haha; it has to have at least one leg clamped on the side. Here are some of the structures I’ve tried or seen:

My current; anything with legs, btw, takes up space on your table, which is bad if you have lots of stuff (but good if you don’t have that much stuff so it doesn’t look as empty haha):

image

I used this at Snafucon:

image

I think this is the standard that most people do:

image

Shared my friends version of this at AX; it went over once or twice because the under table was bad for our clamps; we figured out it was more stable if we flipped the rubber yellow parts of the clamp mouth backward so they couldn’t slide out:

image

I just learned this one this year and a friend says it’s very stable; I don’t know if they use two more clamps on the front but I would imagine not:

image

Some important points:

-Make sure you know the length  of the table. If your top length pipe is too long, you’re screwed.

-Make sure you factor in the added height of the clamp base if there is a height limit for displays at your con (AX has this). A clamp adds an extra 2-3 inches to your display height and if you only measure your piping your display will be too tall.

-Whatever you do, make sure it’s stable. Don’t put it up wobbly and just think, “oh I’ll just be careful.” Wind will come from somewhere, you’ll be helping someone and get distracted, or customers will bump it and poke it and pull on it no matter what you do, so you want to make sure it can’t fall over. Keep the clamps on the back or sides of the table, not where customers (or their children) can bump them or mess with them. Keep in mind that your customers at cons are incredibly excited and usually distracted, that’s the nature of cons, so you’re really responsible for your own stuff here.

Yay!! Ive been looking for something like this. <3

Photo 16 Sep 130 notes kilomonster:

monstersgardencomic:

Chapter 3, pgs 111 &amp; 112: In which a knight in shining armor arrives.
[START @ THE BEGINNING] - [SUPPORT @ PATREON]

IT’S STILL MONDAY IN HAWAII YOU GUYS.
Video 9 Sep 1,679 notes

coelasquid:

Cockeyed.com is one of my favourite websites on the internet, run by an armchair scientist who goes out and does a practical experiment for whatever question stuck in his craw on a particular day, and tries to make practical frames of reference for comprehending numbers and amounts that people don’t normally try to think about. Among the crowning achievements of the site are the photographic height and weight chart made out of unedited, self-submitted photos of real people and the journal of his adventure turning a 12 foot satellite dish into a mirrored parabola death ray to zap things like pop tarts and bars of soap with.

Anyway, I was particularly entertained by their story of wanting to be able to visualize how much blood is in an average adult human by going out to dump six quarts of fake blood at the end of a dead-end street, only to be disappointed by the fairly unimpressive 36 square feet the blood stain covered after they spent the afternoon trying to rake it out by hand to look as big and scary as possible.

Horror writers take note, there isn’t nearly as much blood as you think inside a person.


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